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The Graciela Wilborn Foreign Language Teacher of the Year Award

The FLAND Foreign Language Teacher of the Year Award was renamed the Graciela Wilborn Foreign Language Teacher of the Year Award after the passing of well-loved UND Spanish Professor Graciela Wilborn.
Karen Rosby, formerly of Grand Forks Public Schools writes:
Who was Graciela Wilborn? Many of you knew Graciela very well, some of you met her at FLAND sessions and became professional acquaintances, and quite a few of you had the good fortune to be her students. There may be many new FLAND members, however, who don't know who she was or why our organization has honored her by naming our annual teaching award for her. In 1991, I nominated Graciela for a national award --the Central States Founders Award. I was limited to ten pages! When Dr. Clifford, then President of UND, handed me her monstrous file, I knew that the biggest challenge would be to try to condense the accomplishments of this incredible human being onto only ten typed pages. In this space, I have tried to reduce that ten pages to several paragraphs. Graciela Wilborn received her Bachelor of Arts from the National University in Mexico City. She completed her Master of Arts at Middlebury School of Languages, Vermont, after study in Madrid. Her teaching experience included St. Mary's Elementary in Grand Forks, Williston High School, and every level and type of course at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. If there was anything happening in Spanish, from elementary school to the ND high school Spanish conventions, Graciela was there to lend her leadership, expertise, and hard work. She contributed to countless publications, was a presenter both locally, state-wide, and nationally. She served in every leadership position imaginable within FLAND, FLARR, AATSP, and many committees and positions on campus relating to international studies and language. Her involvement was phenomenal and it built a rapport within the UND power structure which enhanced the advancement of language study not only at UND, but ultimately, within the state as a whole. Graciela's compassionate interest in people was evident in her volunteerism. She translated for the courts, taught catechism to migrant workers, worked with the Special Olympics, and was never too busy to visit the elderly of her parish. She was, as her name so aptly states, a woman of amazing "grace." -Karen Rosby
reprinted from FLAND News


Awards Nominate ND FL TOY recipients